Events


MAR
25
Date:
Monday, 25 Mar 2019
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
Holden G36
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Africa Week kick-off social. There will be a demonstration of modern dances from Africa and the diaspora. African food will be served! 

MAR
26
Date:
Tuesday, 26 Mar 2019
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
RCAH Theatre
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Join us for a screening of Iron Ladies of Liberia (2009) to be followed by commentary and discussion.

Film Synopsis:

After surviving a 14-year civil war and a government riddled with corruption, Liberia is ready for change. On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was inaugurated President – the first freely elected female head of state in Africa. Having won a hotly contested election with the overwhelming support of women across Liberia, Sirleaf faces the daunting task of lifting her country from debt and devastation. She turns to a remarkable team of women, appointing them in positions such as police chief, finance minister, minister of justice, commerce minister and minister of gender. 
 
With exclusive access, directors Siatta Scott Johnson and Daniel Junge follow these "Iron Ladies" behind the scenes during their critical first year in office as they tackle indolent bureaucracy, black markets and the omnipresent threat of violent riots. Highlighting the challenges that African countries currently face, this film provides an uplifting example of women who have become the backbone of change. As the filmmakers explore a historic transition from authoritarianism to democracy, the viewer is treated to a joyous, inspirational testimony of the political power of women's leadership and diplomacy.
 

About the Series:

In honor of Women's History Month, the African Studies Center, in collaboration with the Center for Gender in a Global Context, presents four films which shine a light on women in Africa and the African Diaspora.

This film series bring a critical eye to issues impacting women on a day-to-day basis, including leadership, justice, and perseverance. By combining these films with critical analysis by experts within and beyond the MSU community, we hope to expand understandings of women throughout the Diaspora.

Sponsored by the African Studies Center, the Center for Gender in a Global Context, the History Department, and African American and African Studies.

 

 

MAR
27
Date:
Wednesday, 27 Mar 2019
Time:
6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Location:
Bessey Hall Rm 112
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THEME: Modernization of Tradition in Africa. The discussion will be centered on African traditions in African culture, current practice of tradition and the role of tradition in the future.

MAR
28
Date:
Thursday, 28 Mar 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Room 201, International Center
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Details forthcoming.

Date:
Thursday, 28 Mar 2019
Time:
2:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Location:
International Center rm 201
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Q&A session with H.E. Ambassador Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao - Ambassador of African Union Mission to the United States THEME: African Women in Leadership and prospects for the younger generation

MAR
29
Date:
Friday, 29 Mar 2019
Time:
9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Location:
Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center
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Since its inception in 2016, the African Graduate Student Association (AGSA) at Michigan State Universiy has put together an Annual Reserch Conference. The primary purpose is to share ideas arising from research, conducted by graduate students working on African issues and deliberate on ways to create and strengthen networks among researchers, decision-makers, and civil society. The 4th annual conference will converge African graduate and undergraduate students, faculty/staff members, development organizations, and opinion leaders from across the mid-West and generally, from the United States.

This event is supported in part by a Year of Global Africa mini-grant.

Date:
Friday, 29 Mar 2019
Time:
5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
McDonel Hall, 817 E Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48825
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Taste of Africa is an event open to the public, hosted by Kongamano.  At the end of Africa Week, Kongamano hosts a dinner in which African food is catered and basic African dishes are taught and cooked on-site. Dinner, African performances, and a Raffle for Snares to Ware will take place.

APR
4
Date:
Thursday, 04 Apr 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Room 303, International Center
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Details Forthcoming.

APR
8
Date:
Monday, 08 Apr 2019
Time:
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Location:
Various locations on campus: TBD
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Tracing our forgotten Africa is a week-long celebration of the future Africa we want to see and homages to the Continent we know and love. The week long events of culture, panels, and film will take place April 8-12, 2019. Our hope is that together we can connect, collaborate and brainstorm the many ways we can push Africa to the forefront.

This event is supported in part by a Year of Global Africa mini-grant.

APR
11
Date:
Thursday, 11 Apr 2019
Time:
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Room 201, International Center
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About the Talk:

In the early 1950s, young people in Kinshasa, Belgian Congo, became infatuated with the figure of Buffalo Bill, with his feats and exploits, and with his flamboyant looks as images of the famed plainsman unreeled on the screens of their makeshift movie parlors. The man that Theodore Roosevelt so vaunted and rhapsodized as "the most renowned of those men, steel-thewed and iron nerved, whose daring opened the West to settlement and civilization" became the paragon of masculinity and the embodiment of manhood for many young people in Kinshasa. Buffalo Bill, or rather his romanticization through the lenses of Hollywood, enabled those young viewers to forge new standards of masculinity in a colonial environment that denied them manhood and, instead, essentialized the Congolese man as a "grand enfant" (big child) and, worse, as a macaque (monkey). Accordingly, they called themselves Bills and adopted the swagger, the scripts, and the silences of their eponymous hero. They formed gangs of Bills, infused their quest for masculinity with deeds of derring-do and esoteric street slang, and relied on martial arts, kintulu (bodybuilding), as well as on kamô (magical rituals) to get the upper hand in fights over monikers, turfs, and girls. Tropical Cowboys is not just a meditation on manhood, nor is it only a study of the tropicalization of the American West. It takes first and foremost a rather unorthodox view of popular cultures, exploring the grayish areas, those hard-to-reach places, the in-between zones where culture meets crime, dream meets drama, and resistance becomes a double-edge sword that liberates as much as it oppresses, and where young people walk a tightrope between making and breaking and construct manhood according to a pendulum process in which the male body is at once preserved and annihilated.

About the Speaker:

Ch. Didier Gondola is Professor of African History and Africana Studies at IUPUI. He earned a Ph.D. in African History from the Université Paris 7. His publications include numerous books, articles and chapters on popular cultures (music, fashion, gambling, and memory), gender and postcolonial issues in Central Africa and the African diaspora in France. In 2008-09, he was selected as a US Department of State Fulbright scholar and carried out both research and teaching activities at the Université de Kinshasa, Congo. He developed his manuscript on the Tropical Cowboys (IU Press, 2016) in 2011-12 as a senior fellow at the Nantes Institute for Advanced Studies, in France.  He has just returned from a yearlong research leave at the Collegium of Lyon, France, and worked on a collaborative project that focuses on the emergence of HIVs in colonial Africa. The project brings together a team of virologists, epidemiologists, demographers, historians, and anthropologists based in the US, Europe and Africa.  In addition, he is preparing a biography of André Matswa Grenard, a political activist and charismatic visionary who campaigned for emancipation in France and the French Congo during the 1920s and 1930s.